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Jialee's parts list & a quick rundown on power
#1
Wink 
Hello all! Prepare your fiber!

Here is a list of parts I am sharing with my Norcal group, and the rest of you. These links are tailored for my neighbors here in Northern California, and anywhere in the U.S. really. I've also created an amazon affiliate account to donate back to the community. This would be used towards funding experimental builds for blogging, youtube, and for giveaways. 


Let’s break down Power
Power = Wattage = Voltage * Amperage

The Orange Pi Primes use 5v 2.5A max draw from source, each. 12.5W. 12.5 x 8 is, you guessed it, 100Watts. According to posts I’ve seen on other forums, at full load the Primes tested at about 12.4+W apiece on average in a cluster. 

I opt for switching power supplies and LED drivers, which are both designed to deliver constant voltage, regardless of the load. (load=resistance) They achieve them in different ways but the result we perceive is the same. When adding up your 12v, or 5v components, just make sure you don’t overdraw your power supply (draw=flow=amperage) and you have enough headroom. 

You can opt for a power supply with multiple rails (3v, 5v, 12v) like your average computer PSU, if you have the headroom. I opt for more targeted individual supplies, personally.

I’m trying to set you up for success, no matter what your circumstances. 

Tools
If you have the tools, and you know how to use them, they will pay you back ten-fold. This kit will enable you to make your own ethernet cables, I hope you all can find a piece of scrap, so you won’t have to order yourself an ethernet cable to cut up, regardless, they are cheap and plentiful, as long as you don’t go to buy one at a large retailer, where the markup seems to be 100x. 

Learn to solder. It may take you up to an hour or 2 of practice, but a steady hand and patience is all it takes, and it is well worth it. Youtube is a great resource. Make sure to get a whole kit with a solder wick and/or sucker (to remove excess solder) a stand, and the solder itself with a rosin core. Here is a cheap kit.

I’m personally not using any connectors. I’ll snip a connection and resolder if required. If you would like to use some solder-free connectors, I’ve used these with much success, used commonly for car audio applications. (or go down to harbor freight.)

You can use heat shrink tubing, or you can do what I plan to do and use electrical tape to cover your joints. If you can run down to harbor freight, you can pick up 5x as many rolls for 1/3rd the price. While you’re there, go to the auto install section and pick up their packs of connectors and grommets, they may have a soldering Iron, zip ties. Things like this will come in handy. Testnet will probably be all about keeping up, especially for DIY miners, tools help prepare you. 

Power Supplies (PSU)

Here is my 5v PSU, (100W @ 20A) - For 8 Pi’s
Here is a 2nd option, (50W @ 10A) - For 4 pi’s
Here is my 12v PSU, (24w @2A) - I’ve ordered this one, I could fit 2 in the outstretched palm of my hand.

Once we’ve figured out our power, it’s really just 8 pi’s and a router, or a router/switch combo.

So, grab 8x orange pi primes. (2gb ram)
My top pick for this particular point in time.. Is trying to nab some at iotandmaker.com, they are quick if they’re in stock. Great shipping from Turkey from what I’ve seen! Credit to my Norcal telegram group for verifying the shipping speed! If it’s in stock, this may be the place.

aliexpress.com -if it’s in stock, go for it, but I can’t guarantee when you’ll get it.

Fasttech.com - same deal as ali. 

Anywhere else I can’t vouch for, these 3 I know to be from the distributor. 

SD Cards, these are the ones you want. Feel free to upgrade to 32gb, it’s $2 more and who knows, may give you more optionality in the future.

On to routers, here’s a quote from LDN from one of the chats: 
Quote:“Ok, heard back from the hardware team regarding official miner hardware:
So the hardware (router) limit is 100mbps, however the team does not think this limit will be reached any time soon.
When it becomes a necessity, then there will be upgrade solutions.
The bandwidth testing is a big part of the testnet, and we will help figure out what all is needed together.
So, personally I am not upgrading from my 100mbps to gigabit as skywire will not use this for a little while.
In terms of connecting to the router in the miner, an ethernet cable into the port marked "WAN" is fine, however depending on the user's network environment, settings may be different.
I'm still working on a setup manual for the software (delayed due to all these hardware questions), and the devs are making one as well.
The team is adding more human resources to be able to give more support and answers to the Skywire builders and community.
Testnet will help figure out a lot of these questions.
Sam has said current router will not support OpenWRT, but many have got it working without the need for that.
I think a big takeaway is that the hardware will need to be upgraded quite often to keep up with the rapid development from the team. Especially during testnet”

Great info. Thanks LDN.

Here is the router I chose, the Tp-Link TL-WR1043ND which supports a gigabit connection. Some versions are harder to flash than others I hear, but many have had easy success flashing this one. This was affordable and compact, and 12V -even if it uses 3x the power as the edgerouter x, drawing 1.5A

I like the Ubiquiti edgerouter X, in fact I think I would prefer it, but it looks like a bitch to flash over to openWRT. Seeing as openWRT may or may not be required at start, this may be an even more viable contender? None of us can really say until testnet. I’ll be picking one up to play around with. 

If you are running 8 Opi’s and your router doesn’t have at least 9 ports, then you’ll need a gigabit switch, this one is 12v @ 0.5A, to run on my 12v PSU.

Standoffs and screws etc. Pick up 2 of these. If you’d like more of a variety and more optionality, look into adding a mixed kit, they’re all over. I use keywords like “standoff kit.” In fact I suggest keeping some around if you can afford it. It’s not completely necessary for functionality, but you don’t want to be caught with your pants down.

Let’s sum up our parts list:
Here is my 5v PSU, (100W @ 20A) - For 8 Pi’s
Here is a 2nd option, (50W @ 10A) - For 4 pi’s
Here is my 12v PSU, (24w @2A)
Ethernet cable-crimping kit (cat5e) 
Soldering kit (You may buy a nicer one if you can afford it)
Orange Pi Primes (2GB RAM) @
iotandmaker.com (best kept secret)
Aliexpress.com
Fasttech
SD Cards (1 per pi)
12v Router
12v Switch
Standoffs/screws, you’ll need 2 if you’re running 8 pi’s, you could probably get by with 1 set. you can also use chopsticks, zip ties, and bubble gum. Just don't let any moisture from the gum short any connections......

My point is you can get creative.

Options:
Crimp-style quick disconnect terminal connectors.

Omitted items like a case, fans, electrical tape, ethernet cable scraps, wire.

A 2u server case should serve you well and is ready for affordable colo.

Do not assume this list to be complete, use your head and please don’t blindly order items. These are guidelines only.

Good luck! Be creative! You don't need to stay inside the box Wink
[-] The following 3 users say Thank You to JiaLee for this post:
  • Lancek, matthewblair, skyguy
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#2
(02-17-2018, 08:04 AM)JiaLee Wrote: Hello all! Prepare your fiber!

Here is a list of parts I am sharing with my Norcal group, and the rest of you. These links are tailored for my neighbors here in Northern California, and anywhere in the U.S. really. I've also created an amazon affiliate account to donate back to the community. This would be used towards funding experimental builds for blogging, youtube, and for giveaways. 


Let’s break down Power
Power = Wattage = Voltage * Amperage

The Orange Pi Primes use 5v 2.5A max draw from source, each. 12.5W. 12.5 x 8 is, you guessed it, 100Watts. According to posts I’ve seen on other forums, at full load the Primes tested at about 12.4+W apiece on average in a cluster. 

I opt for switching power supplies and LED drivers, which are both designed to deliver constant voltage, regardless of the load. (load=resistance) They achieve them in different ways but the result we perceive is the same. When adding up your 12v, or 5v components, just make sure you don’t overdraw your power supply (draw=flow=amperage) and you have enough headroom. 

You can opt for a power supply with multiple rails (3v, 5v, 12v) like your average computer PSU, if you have the headroom. I opt for more targeted individual supplies, personally.

I’m trying to set you up for success, no matter what your circumstances. 

Tools
If you have the tools, and you know how to use them, they will pay you back ten-fold. This kit will enable you to make your own ethernet cables, I hope you all can find a piece of scrap, so you won’t have to order yourself an ethernet cable to cut up, regardless, they are cheap and plentiful, as long as you don’t go to buy one at a large retailer, where the markup seems to be 100x. 

Learn to solder. It may take you up to an hour or 2 of practice, but a steady hand and patience is all it takes, and it is well worth it. Youtube is a great resource. Make sure to get a whole kit with a solder wick and/or sucker (to remove excess solder) a stand, and the solder itself with a rosin core. Here is a cheap kit.

I’m personally not using any connectors. I’ll snip a connection and resolder if required. If you would like to use some solder-free connectors, I’ve used these with much success, used commonly for car audio applications. (or go down to harbor freight.)

You can use heat shrink tubing, or you can do what I plan to do and use electrical tape to cover your joints. If you can run down to harbor freight, you can pick up 5x as many rolls for 1/3rd the price. While you’re there, go to the auto install section and pick up their packs of connectors and grommets, they may have a soldering Iron, zip ties. Things like this will come in handy. Testnet will probably be all about keeping up, especially for DIY miners, tools help prepare you. 

Power Supplies (PSU)

Here is my 5v PSU, (100W @ 20A) - For 8 Pi’s
Here is a 2nd option, (50W @ 10A) - For 4 pi’s
Here is my 12v PSU, (24w @2A) - I’ve ordered this one, I could fit 2 in the outstretched palm of my hand.

Once we’ve figured out our power, it’s really just 8 pi’s and a router, or a router/switch combo.

So, grab 8x orange pi primes. (2gb ram)
My top pick for this particular point in time.. Is trying to nab some at iotandmaker.com, they are quick if they’re in stock. Great shipping from Turkey from what I’ve seen! Credit to my Norcal telegram group for verifying the shipping speed! If it’s in stock, this may be the place.

aliexpress.com -if it’s in stock, go for it, but I can’t guarantee when you’ll get it.

Fasttech.com - same deal as ali. 

Anywhere else I can’t vouch for, these 3 I know to be from the distributor. 

SD Cards, these are the ones you want. Feel free to upgrade to 32gb, it’s $2 more and who knows, may give you more optionality in the future.

On to routers, here’s a quote from LDN from one of the chats: 
Quote:“Ok, heard back from the hardware team regarding official miner hardware:
So the hardware (router) limit is 100mbps, however the team does not think this limit will be reached any time soon.
When it becomes a necessity, then there will be upgrade solutions.
The bandwidth testing is a big part of the testnet, and we will help figure out what all is needed together.
So, personally I am not upgrading from my 100mbps to gigabit as skywire will not use this for a little while.
In terms of connecting to the router in the miner, an ethernet cable into the port marked "WAN" is fine, however depending on the user's network environment, settings may be different.
I'm still working on a setup manual for the software (delayed due to all these hardware questions), and the devs are making one as well.
The team is adding more human resources to be able to give more support and answers to the Skywire builders and community.
Testnet will help figure out a lot of these questions.
Sam has said current router will not support OpenWRT, but many have got it working without the need for that.
I think a big takeaway is that the hardware will need to be upgraded quite often to keep up with the rapid development from the team. Especially during testnet”

Great info. Thanks LDN.

Here is the router I chose, the Tp-Link TL-WR1043ND which supports a gigabit connection. Some versions are harder to flash than others I hear, but many have had easy success flashing this one. This was affordable and compact, and 12V -even if it uses 3x the power as the edgerouter x, drawing 1.5A

I like the Ubiquiti edgerouter X, in fact I think I would prefer it, but it looks like a bitch to flash over to openWRT. Seeing as openWRT may or may not be required at start, this may be an even more viable contender? None of us can really say until testnet. I’ll be picking one up to play around with. 

If you are running 8 Opi’s and your router doesn’t have at least 9 ports, then you’ll need a gigabit switch, this one is 12v @ 0.5A, to run on my 12v PSU.

Standoffs and screws etc. Pick up 2 of these. If you’d like more of a variety and more optionality, look into adding a mixed kit, they’re all over. I use keywords like “standoff kit.” In fact I suggest keeping some around if you can afford it. It’s not completely necessary for functionality, but you don’t want to be caught with your pants down.

Let’s sum up our parts list:
Here is my 5v PSU, (100W @ 20A) - For 8 Pi’s
Here is a 2nd option, (50W @ 10A) - For 4 pi’s
Here is my 12v PSU, (24w @2A)
Ethernet cable-crimping kit (cat5e) 
Soldering kit (You may buy a nicer one if you can afford it)
Orange Pi Primes (2GB RAM) @
iotandmaker.com (best kept secret)
Aliexpress.com
Fasttech
SD Cards (1 per pi)
12v Router
12v Switch
Standoffs/screws, you’ll need 2 if you’re running 8 pi’s, you could probably get by with 1 set. you can also use chopsticks, zip ties, and bubble gum. Just don't let any moisture from the gum short any connections......

My point is you can get creative.

Options:
Crimp-style quick disconnect terminal connectors.

Omitted items like a case, fans, electrical tape, ethernet cable scraps, wire. If you’re not sure what you’re doing with wire, a good rule of thumb is 12AWG for DC, 10AWG for AC. This is not a hard rule, but it applies here.

A 2u server case should serve you well and is ready for affordable colo.

Do not assume this list to be complete, use your head and please don’t blindly order items. These are guidelines only.

Good luck! Be creative! You don't need to stay inside the box Wink

What power distribution board do you use to connect the Pi's to the PSU?
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#3
(02-22-2018, 08:36 PM)rotn4 Wrote: What power distribution board do you use to connect the Pi's to the PSU?


I wire it by hand, you can find the power plug adapters for the Pi's on some of the pinned parts lists on the skywire subforum. I did not include those on my list, you'll be able to wire those directly to the DC rails.
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